Biphetamine

  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine
  • Biphetamine

Biphetamine

$4

How should this medicine be used?

The combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine comes as an immediate-relase tablet (Adderall) and as an extended-release (long-acting) capsule (Adderall XR, Mydayis) to take by mouth. The immedia ...

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How should this medicine be used?

The combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine comes as an immediate-relase tablet (Adderall) and as an extended-release (long-acting) capsule (Adderall XR, Mydayis) to take by mouth. The immediate-release tablet (Adderall) is usually taken 2 to 3 times daily, 4 to 6 hours apart, with or without food. The extended-release capsule (Adderall XR) is usually taken upon awakening with or without food. The extended-release capsule (Mydayis) is usually taken upon awakening and must be taken consistently either with or without food. Dextroamphetamine and amphetamine combination should not be taken in the late afternoon or evening because it may cause difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take dextroamphetamine and amphetamine exactly as directed.

Swallow the extended-release capsules whole; do not chew or crush them. If you are unable to swallow the extended-release capsule, you may open the capsule and sprinkle the entire contents on a teaspoonful of applesauce. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not store the applesauce and medication mixture for future use, and do not divide the contents of one capsule into more than one dose.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine and increase your dose gradually, not more often than once every week.

Your doctor may tell you to stop taking dextroamphetamine and amphetamine from time to time to see if the medication is still needed. Follow these directions carefully.

The medication in each product is absorbed differently by the body, so one dextroamphetamine and amphetamine product cannot be substituted for another product. If you are switching from one product to another, your doctor will prescribe a dose that is best for you.

Other uses for this medicine

The combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine should not be used to treat excessive tiredness that is not caused by narcolepsy.

This medication may be prescribed for other conditions; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

BEFORE TAKING DEXTROAMPHETAMINE AND AMPHETAMINE,

  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, other stimulant medications such as benzphetamine, lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse), or methamphetamine (Desoxyn); any other medications, or any of the ingredients in dextroamphetamine and amphetamine preparations. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • Tell your doctor if you are taking the following medications or have stopped taking them in the past 14 days: monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors including isocarboxazid (Marplan), linezolid (Zyvox), methylene blue, phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). If you stop taking dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, you should wait at least 14 days before you start to take an MAO inhibitor.
  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, and herbal products you are taking. Be sure to mention any of the following: acetazolamide (Diamox); alpha blockers such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), tamsulosin (Flomax, in Jalyn), and terazosin; antacids and other medications for heartburn or ulcers such as cimetidine (Tagamet), esomeprazole (Nexium), omeprazole (Prilosec, in Zegerid), and pantoprazole (Protonix); antidepressants (‘mood elevators’); antihistamines (medications for colds and allergies); ascorbic acid (Vitamin C); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard), and propranolol (Inderal, Innopran); buspirone; chlorpromazine; fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Subsys, others); guanethidine (no longer available in U.S.); lithium (Lithobid); meperidine (Demerol); methenamine (Hiprex, Urex); medications for migraine headaches such as almotriptan (Axert), eletriptan (Relpax), frovatriptan (Frova), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), sumatriptan (Imitrex, in Treximet), and zolmitriptan (Zomig); quinidine (in Nuedexta); reserpine; ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra); certain medications for seizures such as ethosuximide (Zarontin), phenobarbital, and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, in Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Brisdelle, Prozac, Pexeva), and sertraline (Zoloft); serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors such as desvenlafaxine (Khedezla, Pristiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), milnacipran (Savella), and venlafaxine (Effexor); sodium bicarbonate (Arm and Hammer Baking Soda, Soda Mint); sodium phosphate; certain thiazide diuretics (‘water pills’); tramadol (Conzip, in Ultracet); or tricyclic antidepressants (‘mood elevators’) such as desipramine (Norpramin) or protriptyline (Vivactil). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • Tell your doctor what herbal products you are taking, especially St. John’s wort and tryptophan or nutritional supplements including glutamic acid (L-glutamine).
  • Tell your doctor if you have glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye that may cause vision loss), hyperthyroidism (condition in which there is too much thyroid hormone in the body), or feelings of anxiety, tension, or agitation. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take dextroamphetamine and amphetamine.
  • Tell your doctor if anyone in your family has or has ever had an irregular heartbeat or has died suddenly. Also tell your doctor if you have recently had a heart attack and if you have or have ever had a heart defect, high blood pressure, an irregular heartbeat, hardening of the arteries, heart or blood vessel disease, or other heart problems. Your doctor will examine you to see if your heart and blood vessels are healthy. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take dextroamphetamine and amphetamine if you have a heart condition or if there is a high risk that you may develop a heart condition.
  • Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had depression, bipolar disorder (mood that changes from depressed to abnormally excited), or mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood), motor tics (repeated uncontrollable movements), verbal tics (repetition of sounds or words that is hard to control), or Tourette’s syndrome (a condition characterized by the need to perform repeated motions or to repeat sounds or words), or has thought about or attempted suicide. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had mental illness, seizures, an abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG; a test that measures electrical activity in the brain), or liver or kidney disease.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. If you become pregnant while taking dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, call your doctor. Do not breastfeed while taking dextroamphetamine and amphetamine.
  • Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking dextroamphetamine and amphetamine if you are 65 years of age or older. Older adults should not usually take dextroamphetamine and amphetamine because it is not as safe as other medications that can be used to treat the same condition.
  • you should know that this medication may make it difficult for you to perform activities that require alertness or physical coordination. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
  • You should know that dextroamphetamine and amphetamine should be used as part of a total treatment program for ADHD, which may include counseling and special education. Make sure to follow all of your doctor’s and/or therapist’s instructions.
  • You should know that dextroamphetamine and amphetamine may cause sudden death in children and teenagers, especially children and teenagers who have heart defects or serious heart problems. This medication also may cause sudden death, heart attack, or stroke in adults, especially adults with heart defects or serious heart problems. Call your or your child’s doctor right away and get emergency help, if you or your child has any signs of heart problems while taking this medication including: chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting.

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